Mark Rowe

Mark Rowe is a trained journalist and author with more than 25 years’ experience of writing on the planet’s major environmental issues, from climate change to renewable energy and poverty alleviation as well as wildlife and landscapes. Having cut his teeth and qualified on local papers in the north of England, he worked in Estonia on th Baltic Independent before working for the Telegraph and then news editor at the Independent on Sunday. He writes for a wide range of titles, including the Telegraph, Guardian, BBC Wildlife, the i, Nat Geo Traveller UK, Country, Land & Business and also writes the Behind the Headlines column for BBC Countryfile as well as political pieces for The House magazine and Civil Service World. He is the author of three popular green travel guides for Bradt, on the Outer Hebrides, Orkney and the Isle of Wight. He has written Geographical’s dossiers since 2005.


The global effort to improve the world’s slums

The global effort to improve the world’s slums

Jun 22, 2022
One billion people around the world still live in sub-optimal housing, but attitudes towards upgrading slums are changing
The rising threat of invasive species

The rising threat of invasive species

May 11, 2022
Invasive species are considered one of the greatest threats to biodiversity, but controlling them is extremely challenging
The terrifying cost of scrapping the world’s ageing oil and gas rigs

The terrifying cost of scrapping the world’s ageing oil and gas rigs

Feb 28, 2022
As the world turns away from fossil fuels, how do we go about decommissioning the world’s oil and gas rigs?
St Kilda – the rugged, isolated beauty of the UK’s seabird haven

St Kilda – the rugged, isolated beauty of the UK’s seabird haven

Aug 28, 2020
The depopulated Scottish islands of St Kilda continue to pull in visitors – and are a barometer of the threats faced by the UK’s seabirds.
The failure of Britain’s national parks

The failure of Britain’s national parks

Mar 12, 2020
What future lies ahead for Britain’s national parks and can they really serve the needs of both people and nature?
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