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A new study has found that the Arctic Ocean is acidifying more rapidly and more widely than projected

Ocean mixing explained

A team of researchers has solved the mystery of how deep and mid-depth ocean waters are mixed, providing a vital insight for climate modellers
The puzzling growth of sea ice in parts of Antarctica is probably the result of strengthening winds blowing over the continent, according to a new study

The science of slums

In an edited extract from his new book, Danny Dorling argues that the idea of the population bomb is a fallacy and that the human population is checking its rise without the need for a grand plan

The great escape

In an edited extract from his book, Walls: Travels along the Barricades, Marcello Di Cintio meets some of the thousands of migrants who attempt to enter Europe via Ceuta, one of Spain’s Moroccan enclaves

Hotspot – Russia

There is no easier way to insult a country than to deface their flag. Klaus Dodds looks into the recent Russian flag controversy, and explores the complicated relationship between countries and flags

Looking differently

Rainforest conservation has long focused on pristine jungle and indigenous communities. Geordie Torr visits a new project in Manu, Peru, that’s instead investigating the importance of degraded forest and immigrant communities

Death of the riverboats

Part of a huge hydro-electricity project on the Mekong River and its tributaries, the construction of the Nam Ou 2 dam in Laos could devastate the lives of thousands who rely on the river for their income
A team of scientists has found evidence of an enormous, previously unknown canyon hidden under the Greenland ice
A new study has found a clear link between earthquake activity and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in a small town in Ohio
A team of French scientists has used sediment cores dating back 70,000–80,000 years to resolve a long-standing paradox about the formation of the Arctic ice sheet 
Global warming is causing crop pests to spread to higher latitudes at a rate of almost three kilometres a year, a new study has revealed
So much rain fell on Australia in 2010 and 2011 that the global sea-level not only stopped rising, but actually dropped measurably, according to a new study
Soot, or black carbon, released into the air as Europe rapidly industrialised, was probably responsible for the abrupt retreat of mountain glaciers in the Alps, according to a new study
Careful analysis of a 150-year-old moss bank on the Antarctic Peninsula has revealed an unprecedented rate of ecological change since the 1960s, driven by warming temperatures

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