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The concept of renewable energy in the Middle East sounds incongruous, for this is a region that is home to more than half of the world’s crude oil and more than a third of its natural gas reserves. However, local…
In an epic new book from traveller and curator Susan Whitfield, 80 leading scholars detail the history of the fabled Silk Road is through its people, cultures and landscapes
Massive scientific investment has now identified the primary threats to biodiversity, but comparably little research has examined how and why some conservation initiatives spread while others falter
The Chinese government aims to put a ‘social credit system’ in place by 2020; a virtual scoring platform that uses personal data to assess the behaviour and ‘trustworthiness’ of every citizen. But can 24/7 surveillance ever be a good thing,…
A new green cemetery in Paris indicates the growing desire among citizens for an eco-friendly death
How the best-selling author is making complex matters of geography accessible for the next generation
Protestors claim the nation’s neo-liberal system is broken. Amid bullets and tear gas, socio-economic reforms are being rushed through. With the COP25 climate conference fast approaching, could this spotlight on equity help deepen commitments to the Paris Climate Agreement?
From 26 October, tourists will no longer be able to climb Uluru. Chris Fitch heads to the sacred site to discover what this means for Aboriginal people and visitors alike
Ed Stafford is a former British army captain who became the first person to walk the length of the Amazon River. His most recent book, Expeditions Unpacked, about the equipment used on some of the world’s most famous journeys, is…
As the world’s attention focuses on the protests in Santiago, eyes are also being drawn to the Chilean government’s mixed messages on environmental matters ahead of this year’s COP25 summit
Vast quantities of sand are being deposited along a stretch of the Norfolk coast to slow down coastal erosion
The world’s first hydrogen-powered boat to tour the world, Energy Observer, has sailed into London. With no CO2 emissions, no fine particles and no noise that could disturb underwater fauna, the ship is the first of its kind and potentially…
An experiment that asked different sized groups to invent a new language has revealed that community size plays an important role in determining the type of language that develops
Commemorating a mining tragedy that shocked the nation a decade ago, New Zealand’s rugged West Coast will soon be home to the Paparoa track, the first new ‘Great Walk’ in over 25 years. Chris Fitch takes a walk through a…
Scientists at the Plastic Health Summit taking place in Amsterdam are revealing groundbreaking research on micro- and nanoplastics, warning of their potentially deadly effects on human immune cells
Canadian researchers have found that plastic tea bags, common to premium tea brands, release billions of micro plastics and nano plastic particles
The settlement of Hasankeyf, dating back thousands of years, will soon be lost to history as a hydroelectric power plant begins to fill its reservoir
We took to the streets of Westminster to take a look at London's part in the Global Climate Strike which saw millions across the world march for climate justice today

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