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NATURE

History is littered with examples of fungi helping to digest the detritus and contaminants left by humans. New challenges could reinvigorate the field
The streets of Philadelphia are home to a small and forgotten kernel of African American horse culture – a lineage overshadowed by the typical image of the American cowboy
When photographer Matthew Maran first snapped a fox he had no idea how familiar they would soon become
Coloradans have voted to reintroduce grey wolves to the state
Covid-19 provides an opportunity to re-assess the supply chains of minerals on which the clean-energy transition relies
Andrea DiCenzo is a photojournalist, who has covered conflicts for many years. On November 15th 2015, she encountered scenes of destruction in the newly 'liberated' town of Sinjar, northern Iraq
Field observations of corals around the world reveal that not all species are as susceptible to bleaching as previous models predict
The Great Plains of the USA are once again getting dustier, highlighting the complicated nature of environmental policies
Attempts to build a digital twin of the Earth could lead to the democratisation of climate and environmental data 
Food systems will need to change as the global population grows. With reform, could fishing and aquaculture step up to the challenge?
Zoos do a lot more than welcome excited visitors; closures due to the pandemic are affecting conservation work worldwide
The winner of the Earth Photo competition was Jonk with a set of photos depicting abandoned buildings overtaken by nature
 BluHope is back with a day of webinars to promote protection of the oceans
WildEast, a grassroots community initiative, is encouraging volunteers to commit 20 per cent of any land they own to nature recovery
With growing global awareness of the risks of hunting and consuming bushmeat, a group of researchers decided to speak to those who do it 
Researchers have identified the extent of microplastic contamination throughout the Everest region. Their expedition charts the extent of environmental change and pollution in one of the world’s most sensitive and remote places
The Thames Estuary has long been home to heavy industry, rubbish dumps and drained marshes, but restoration projects are inviting wildlife back in 
Whydahs and indigobirds, collectively known as the vidua finches, show an amazing ability to mimic the chicks of other birds in a parasitic display of Darwinian evolution

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