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Seismometers buried in the Ross Ice Shelf have revealed that its snowy surface constantly vibrates, producing a low rumble of noise that scientists can use to monitor changes
A tightening of restrictions on the insecticides known as neonicotinoids has brought hope that the decline in honey bees and wild pollinators can be reversed. Yet concerns are growing as to how new technology could radically change the landscape. Are we heading towards a world of ‘frankenbees’, in which gene-edited bees are resistant to pesticides and where only the rich can afford to pay for pollinated crops?
Once a constant threat across Bangladesh, arsenic poisoning has significantly reduced thanks to deeper wells
Bonnethead sharks, the second smallest member of the hammerhead family, have been shown to not only eat, but digest seagrass, making them the first omnivorous shark known to scientists
There’s more than enough plastic in the world. That’s why, from now on, our print magazine will be delivered to subscribers in environmentally friendly wrapping
For this month’s Discovering Britain Viewpoint, Laura Cole heads to the Crooked House of Himley, a pub embedded in the Black Country
Once dismissed as undesirable competitors, certain West African shrubs are now being recognised as significant crop enhancers
The recent discovery of more than 200 million termite mounds in northeastern Brazil, the extent of which had never been understood before, throws up more questions than it answers

Tehran: the sinking city

Illegal wells are depleting groundwater basins beneath Tehran causing it to sink dramatically 
In January 2019, a Dutch marine charity, the Flotilla Foundation, is due to send a major international expedition to Antarctica with the aim of exploring the remote, harsh and little studied Weddell Sea
The new year still remains a popular time to set life goals and career targets. There’s no reason why that shouldn’t include your photography, says Keith Wilson
After decades battling environmental crises that threaten to rob the Galápagos Islands of their unique biodiversity, the restoration of giant tortoises is a success story worth celebrating. But more conservation challenges still await the iconic archipelago
As another new year beckons and the fight to protect the climate continues apace, Marco Magrini sends a message to the planet we call home

Hotspot – Street names

When street names become political. Klaus Dodds examines the trend of changing street names to make other nations uncomfortable 
Charles Roberts reccounts the story of George Melville Boynton, perhaps the world's worst explorer

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