Under the sea

There’s a world of visual wonder beneath the waves but it requires equipment, knowledge and an awareness of the environment to properly capture
A short, summer eclipse in America has solar power generators preparing for a literal black out
Of the approximately 7,000 languages thought to be alive, the eight most spoken are accounted for by 40 per cent of the world’s population
HSBC has requested a Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil investigation into one of its own clients, Noble Plantations
After years of debate, the German alphabet has got a new letter, but not everybody is happy about it
A dramatic increase in dust storms across the western United States has occurred alongside an upsurge of valley fever. New research is exploring possible links between the two, and looking at the complex causes of both

The Lighter Side

Benjamin Hennig explores visions of a world made bright by humanity
Kerstin Forsberg is the director of Planeta Océano, a marine conservation organisation based in Peru, and was made a Rolex Laureate for her work protecting giant manta rays in the country
Geographical’s regular look at the world of climate change. This month, Marco Magrini looks at the legal challenges that lie ahead
The EU has asked the European court to authorise an immediate ban on logging in one of Europe’s last primeval forests, Białowieża, in Poland

Glacier Country

For this month’s Discovering Britain viewpoint, Laura Cole visits a glacier’s graveyard in Northern Ireland that is still defying explanation
Was last year’s El Niño a practice run for future climate change? In part three of a blog series for Geographical, Laura Cole shadows the University of Oxford’s Global Ecosystem Monitoring Network and its work to discover the impact of the world’s most well-known weather phenomenon on the planet’s tropical forests
Far from being separate threats, scientists have found links between air pollutants and a rise in type-2 diabetes
A study from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has revealed that the Arctic tundra could release significant amounts of nitrous oxide (also known as laughing gas) into the atmosphere given the right conditions
It’s not just the bees that are disappearing. Insects across the board are showing dramatic drops in population levels, leading to a serious knock-on effect for ecosystems everywhere

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DOSSIERS

Like longer reads? Try our in-depth dossiers that provide a comprehensive view of each topic

  • Diabetes: The World at Risk
    Diabetes is often thought of as a ‘western’ problem, one linked to the developed world’s overindulgence in fatty foods and chronic lack of physi...
    National Clean Air Day
    For National Clean Air Day, Geographical brings together stories about air pollution and the kind of solutions needed to tackle it ...
    REDD+ or Dead?
    The UN-backed REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) scheme, under which developing nations would be paid not to cut dow...
    When the wind blows
    With 1,200 wind turbines due to be built in the UK this year, Mark Rowe explores the continuing controversy surrounding wind power and discusses the e...
    The true cost of meat
    As one of the world’s biggest methane emitters, the meat industry has a lot more to concern itself with than merely dietary issues ...

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