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Young geographers of the year

WINNERS AND HIGHLY COMMENDED ENTRANTS  Front Row (left to right): Zahra Qadeer, Zariya Bennett, Suraya Nurbhai (Winner 9-11 year category), Sofia Estrada  Second Row: Alessia Simonutti, Marcus Baker, Pau Ingles-Prats (Winner 11-14 year category), Anika Lucas  Third Row: Jack Cheek, Anna Modeer, Rosia Lia, Hannah Heus (Winner 14-16 year category)  Fourth Row: Ed Hodgson, Isobel Wragg, Eve Russell (Winner 16-18 year category), Noa Goovaerts  Back Row: Kathryn Crawshay (Rex Walford Winner), Henry Burgess (Guest Speaker: NERC Arctic Office) WINNERS AND HIGHLY COMMENDED ENTRANTS Front Row (left to right): Zahra Qadeer, Zariya Bennett, Suraya Nurbhai (Winner 9-11 year category), Sofia Estrada Second Row: Alessia Simonutti, Marcus Baker, Pau Ingles-Prats (Winner 11-14 year category), Anika Lucas Third Row: Jack Cheek, Anna Modeer, Rosia Lia, Hannah Heus (Winner 14-16 year category) Fourth Row: Ed Hodgson, Isobel Wragg, Eve Russell (Winner 16-18 year category), Noa Goovaerts Back Row: Kathryn Crawshay (Rex Walford Winner), Henry Burgess (Guest Speaker: NERC Arctic Office)
25 Dec
2018
The winners of the 2018 Young Geographer of the Year competition and Rex Walford Award have been announced. Candidates were asked: ‘What makes the Arctic unique?’

The Young Geographer of the Year is a national competition run by the RGS-IBG to encourage pupils to engage with geographical issues. This year, the Society received 1,100 entries from more than 260 schools, with thousands of additional pupils taking part in in-school competitions. Alongside the awards for the Young Geographers, the Society also presented the Rex Walford Award to an early career teacher who created a series of lessons based on the Arctic.

The 2018 competition was an opportunity for geography pupils to explore the unique qualities of the Arctic, in creative and engaging ways. Steve Brace, the Society’s head of education and outdoor learning, said: ‘It’s over 1,000 miles from the UK to the Arctic Circle. This year’s Young Geographers of the Year have comprehensively spanned this distance to produce thoughtful and compelling entries that reveal exactly what makes the Arctic unique. By examining the Arctic’s people, wildlife and its land, sea and ice-scapes, our winners got under the frozen skin of this fascinating region and highlighted many of the challenges that face the Arctic. Thousands of young people took part in this competition – with many schools holding their own semi-finals before submitting their top ten entries to the Society.’

The Society’s Young Geographer of the Year competition recognises the best entries across four categories: Key Stage 2 (pupils aged 9-11); Key Stage 3 (11-14); Key Stage 4 or GCSE (14-16); and Key Stage 5 or A Level (16-18). Pupils in the first three categories were asked to submit an annotated diagram or poster, while A Level pupils were asked to submit a 1,500-word essay, which could include illustrations, maps or graphs. The awards were presented by Henry Burgess, head of the NERC Arctic Office, to the winners and highly commended pupils at an award ceremony at the Society.

The Young Geographer of the Year competition is run by the Society in conjunction with Geographical magazine and is kindly supported by Esri UK, Ordnance Survey, Stanfords, Philip’s and Cotswold Outdoor.

 This was published in the January 2019 edition of Geographical magazine

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