February 2016

February 2016 Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)
A selection of RGS-IBG events including lectures and exhibitions around the UK for February 2016

2 February, 5pm

Surface expressions of climates past

(Lecture, Newcastle)

This talk by Dr Leanne Wake, Northumbria University, will encompass evidence of past glaciation and high sea levels visible in our landscape. It focuses on how deglaciation of Greenland changed the landscape since the last glacial maximum.

Venue: Ellison Building, Northumberland Road, Northumbria University, Newcastle, NE1 8ST. Places: £1, please book in advance. Full information www.rgs.org/yorkshirenortheast


3 February, 4.30pm-8.30pm

Gap travel workshop

(Advice and networking, London)

An evening providing advice, ideas and vital tips for those looking to undertake a purposeful journey before or after university, or as part of a career break. Practical workshop sessions will aid preparation and planning and include gap year opportunities, essential research, safety, security, insurance, health and medical issues. Places: £20, includes drinks and refreshments. Full information www.rgs.org/go


3 February, 7pm

The grand Alpine tour

(Lecture, Cheltenham)

Mark Allan, Northumbria University, describes a 6,000 mile journey across the Alps in the footsteps of some of the earliest explorers and scientists to quantify landscape change and further our understanding of landslides above melting glaciers.

Venue: Room TC001, School of Natural and Social Sciences, University of Gloucestershire, Francis Close Hall Campus, Cheltenham, GL50 4AZ. Places: free and open to all. Further information www.rgs.org/westandsouthwales


4 February, 6.30pm

The Yorkshire coast: past, present and future

(Lecture, Sheffield)

Professor Mike Elliott’s illustrated talk will cover human, geological and ecological features of the Yorkshire coast from Teesside to Humberside and place the coast in the context of the wider North Sea.

Venue: Peak Lecture Theatre, 527 Owen Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, S1 1WB. Places: £3 on the door (RGS-IBG members and students free). Full information www.rgs.org/yorkshirenortheast


4, 9, 10 & 11 February

Safe return doubtful: Endurance retraced

(Lectures, Brecon, Keswick, Darlington & Southampton)

Adventurer Tim Jarvis recounts the Shackleton Epic expedition, an authentic re-enactment of the perilous 1916 voyage from Elephant Island to South Georgia and the subsequent mountainous trek to rescue.

Venues: Theatr Brycheiniog, Brecon; Theatre by the Lake, Keswick; Darlington Civic at Central Hall; Turner Sims, Southampton. www.rgs.org/rtp


Endurance in focusRGS-IBG4 February, 7.30pm

Endurance in focus

(Private view, Collections display and reception, London)

An opportunity to visit the Society’s Shackleton centenary exhibition, Enduring Eye, and view a specially curated display of archival material from our wealth of Antarctic holdings, introduced by Alasdair MacLeod, Head of Collections. Organised by the Society’s Younger Members’ Committee.

Tickets: £28 (RGS-IBG members £26), includes spring buffet and wine reception. www.rgs.org/socialevents


5 February, 7pm

Across Antarctica: legendary leaders

(Endurance centenary film and talk, London)

This special evening celebrates the achievements of two of Antarctica’s greatest explorers. Accompanied by a live pianist, the BFI’s restored version of South will show Sir Ernest Shackleton in archive footage, and Sir Ranulph Fiennes will take to the stage and share his exhilarating life of expeditions.

Tickets £25 (RGS-IBG members £20). www.rgs.org/fiennessouth


9 February, 6.30pm

Ocean currents, ice sheets and climate: a story unravelled by radiogenic isotopes

(Lecture, Cardiff)

A lecture by Tina van de Flierdt, Imperial College London. Part of the lecture series A mass-ive difference: the role of isotopes in solving major problems in Earth and planetary history spanning origins to human influences.

Venue: Wallace Lecture Theatre, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF10 3AT. Free and open to all. www.rgs.org/westandsouthwales


9 February, 7.30pm

Climate change and the risk of conflict

(Lecture, York)

Just a few weeks after the Paris climate summit, Paul Rogers, one of the UK’s leading scholars of peace and war, considers the potential of climate change to initiate conflict.

Venue: Tempest Anderson Hall, Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens, York, YO1 7FR. Places: RGS-IBG members free. Full information www.rgs.org/yorkshirenortheast


15 February, 7.30pm

What glaciers have done for us!

(Lecture, Chester)

Dr Frank Nicholson introduces how glaciers reshaped our geography, changed our climate and still provide us with diverse resources from agricultural land to hydroelectricity. Illustrations are drawn from the Wirral and across the world.

Venue: Grosvenor Museum, Grosvenor Street, Chester, CH1 2DD. Places: £5 donation on the door (RGS-IBG members and students free). Full information www.rgs.org/cheshirenorthwales


16 February, 7.30pm

Wildlife of South Georgia

(Lecture, Norwich)

Andrew Clarke will give an illustrated presentation on the history, birds and other animal life found on the UK's Antarctic outpost in the South Atlantic.

Venue: Pierce Room, Assembly House, Theatre Street, Norwich, NR2 1RQ. Places: £3 on the door (RGS-IBG members and students free). Full information www.rgs.org/eastanglia


17 February, 7pm

Understanding Scotland’s Highlands

(Lecture, Cheltenham)

Focusing on the historical geography of the many landscapes of Scotland’s Highlands, Dr Iain Robertson, University of the Highlands and Islands, will explore the historical and contemporary links between land, culture and identity.

Venue: Room TC001, School of Natural and Social Sciences, University of Gloucestershire, Francis Close Hall Campus, Cheltenham, GL50 4AZ. Free and open to all. Full information www.rgs.org/westandsouthwales


23 February, 6.30pm

Climate change in polar regions: how do we know it’s real?

(Lecture, Sheffield)

Dr Paul Mann discusses evidence of climate change in the most susceptible regions, the poles. His research, including working for the British Antarctic Survey, looks at how the poles respond to environmental change.

Venue: Peak Lecture Theatre, 527 Owen Building, Sheffield Hallam University City Campus, Sheffield, S1 1WB. Places: £3 on the door (RGS-IBG members and students free). Full information www.rgs.org/yorkshirenortheast

 


23 February, 6.30pm

Energy demands and challenges

(Lecture, Chester)

Professor Joe Howe examines the challenges of satisfying demands for energy in an environmentally sustainable and responsible manner. This talk considers the global context of energy production and consumption and local challenges and opportunities.

Venue: Room CBB115 Best Building, University of Chester, Parkgate Road, Chester, CH1 4BJ. Places: £5 donation on the door (RGS-IBG members and students free). For full information visit www.rgs.org/cheshirenorthwales


SolarAbbie Trayler Smith / Panos Pictures / Department for International Development

24 February, 6.30pm

Energy for all

(21st Century Challenges, London)

A reliable, affordable and sustainable energy supply for light, heat and fuel is vital for 21st century living. How can we support local entrepreneurship and help the world’s poorest communities gain access? How is access to energy changing around the world? The panel discussion will be followed by audience Q+A. Tickets: £10 (RGS-IBG members £7, students £5). www.rgs.org/21cc 020 7591 3100


25 February, 7pm

Discovering Places: Nicaragua

(Travel evening and networking, London)

Plan your visit and get essential advice, travel tips and inspiration at this informative evening for first-time travellers to Nicaragua. Network with exhibitors, share plans with fellow travellers and ask questions of our expert panel, who will share their own highlights and hidden gems. Tickets: £15 (RGS-IBG members £10), includes wine and an information pack. www.rgs.org/discoveringplaces 020 7591 3100.


25 February, 7pm

Following Lord Dufferin to high latitudes

(Lecture with reception, Belfast)

Venue: School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology, Queen’s University Belfast, Elmwood Avenue, Belfast, BT7 1NN. Free and open to all. Full information www.rgs.org/northernireland


Mappa MundiMappa Mundi (Image: Dean and Chapter of Hereford Cathedral and the Hereford Mappa Mundi Trust)

25 February, 6.30pm

Mappa mundi: Hereford’s curious map

(Lecture, Birmingham)

Hereford Cathedral’s mappa mundi was once seen as an example of cartographic naivety. Sarah Arrowsmith explores how, far from being proof of scholarly ignorance, the map provides an extraordinary insight into the Medieval world view.

Venue: Birmingham and Midland Institute, Margaret Street, Birmingham, B3 3BS. Places: £3 on the door (RGS-IBG members free). For full information visit www.rgs.org/midlands


25 February, 7.30pm

Dynamics of adventure

(Film screenings and lecture, Ambleside)

Exploring the dynamics of adventure through a series of short films, Scott Rose and Howard Crook consider the role adventure plays in our daily lives, and whether it really has to be ‘out there’. Joint event with University of Cumbria.

Venue: Percival Lecture Theatre, University of Cumbria (Ambleside Campus), Rydal Road, Ambleside, LA22 9BB. Places: free. Full information: www.rgs.org/northwest


26 February, 2.30pm

Icons of Antarctic exploration

(On View display, London)

Scott, Shackleton, Amundsen, Mawson and more… Introduced by Eugene Rae, Principal Librarian, come and view the treasures from the Society’s Collection of Antarctic material. Shackleton’s balaclava, Scott’s matchbox and Mawson’s sextant are just a few of the items on display. Places: £5 (free to RGS-IBG members and educational users. 020 7591 3044, [email protected], www.rgs.org/collectionsevents


27 February, 11am-1pm

Treasures of tropical seas

(Guided walk, Blanchland)

This landscape is 300 million years old, formed as tropical seas laid down limestones, shales, sandstones and coals. Explore evidence of ancient river currents, swamp plant fossils and mineral rich deposits. Meet: at Blanchland car park, Blanchland, DH8 9SS. Optional pub lunch afterwards. Places: free, advance booking essential. Full information www.rgs.org/yorkshirenortheast


29 February, 7.30pm

Earth’s climate evolution: a new perspective

(Lecture, Southampton)

Our understanding of climate change derives from the little-known geological records hidden in rock and ice cores. Dr Colin Summerhayes, University of Southampton, explains how these help us to explain Earth’s current climates and prospective future changes.

Venue: Lecture Theatre A, Shackleton Building, Highfield Campus, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ. Places: £5 on the door (RGS-IBG members and students free). Ful+l information www.rgs.org/south

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