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These days, navigation has seemingly been reduced to pressing a button on a sat nav or GPS. But David Barrie’s lively, eloquent history of the sextant is a reminder that this wasn’t always the case
‘Alien invasion’ is as much an environmental dog-whistle issue as a political one, and many of the same questions apply – notably, do species ‘belong’ where they evolved, or where they end up?
The author’s citrus adventures began when, visiting a garden in the Veneto, she picked up a piece of fallen fruit and learned ‘the only lesson an ignorant orange thief could understand’: that Seville oranges are bitter enough to cauterise the tongue
The word ‘desert’ evokes a place of wearying nothingness, devoid of life, culture or fertility. But, as Roslynn D Haynes, a professor at the University of New South Wales, shows in this beautifully written and sumptuously illustrated new book, the reality…
Defenceless within, undefended without, Tibet remains a victim of the Cold War. Today, only the exiled Dalai Lama survives as a symbol of Tibet’s will to survive and a moral challenge to Chinese occupation
With a referendum on Scottish independence in the offing, it’s a good time to ask the question contained within this book’s subtitle: ‘What has held the UK together and what is dividing it?’
In 1988, the American Museum in Britain – located near Bath – received a bequest of more than 200 Renaissance maps of the New World from Dr Dallas Pratt, the museum’s co-founder
Nick Thorpe, a veteran BBC correspondent, travelled the length of the Danube, Europe's second-longest river. He delved into the rich history and culture of a river that ‘carved a path, or laid a trail, for people to follow westwards’

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