US Election: Nixon’s victory by cartogram

  • Written by  Geographical Archive
  • Published in Mapping
 Former President Nixon in 1968 Former President Nixon in 1968 Maharepa/Creative Commons
03 Nov
2016
The true proportions of Richard Nixon’s victory in the 1972 US presidential election can be shown by cartographic methods

Geographical Archive

Geographical 1973

Geographical 1973

Geographical 1973

Geographical 1973

The true proportions of Mr Nixon’s victory in the USA presiden­tial election can be shown by cartographic methods. A comparison with the 1968 results, using non-contiguous cartograms, indicates the scale of McGovern’s defeat. In fact all but seventeen of the total 538 electoral votes went to the incumbent. The President polled 60 per cent of the total vote and 37.7 per cent passed to George McGovern. Nixon’s share almost matched L.B.J’s 1964 record - 61.1 per cent of the popular vote. At the electoral college level Mr Nixon may be said to be the most successful winner in dropping only Massachussetts and the District of Columbia, while F. D. Roosevelt lost two states out of forty-eight. A more dis­ quieting fact is that the 1972 poll attracted a turnout of just over 56 per cent of the total electorate, the lowest since 1948.

The South, usually quoted as the chief example of political regionalization in the nation, went to Nixon. Arkansas went Republican for the first time in too years. The Democratic tradition in the South was broken in 1968 with only Texas going to Humphrey. Preliminary analysis of precinct data reveals mass switching from Wallace to Nixon in 1972. Further analysis must proceed before suggesting a diminution of Southern Democratic allegiances. However, political scientist Donald S. Strong believes that old loyalties are being replaced by voting based on calculations of class advantage.

This swing towards Republicanism and Nixon did not filter down to other contests. Despite the overwhelming victory of the President, Democrats did remarkably well in these other elections through exceedingly high levels of ticket splitting. In the Senate, for example, the Grand Old Party – Republican – needed four seats to gain a majority but finished by losing two further seats. Perhaps it is here in the Senate, with its increased Democratic majority, that Edward Kennedy will slowly start to prepare his platform for the 1976 contest with Spiro Agnew.

Geographical Archive

Share this story...

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to Twitter

Related items

Geographical Week

Get the best of Geographical delivered straight to your inbox every Friday.

Subscribe Today

EDUCATION PARTNERS

Aberystwyth UniversityUniversity of GreenwichThe University of Winchester

TRAVEL PARTNERS

Ponant

Silversea

Travel the Unknown

DOSSIERS

Like longer reads? Try our in-depth dossiers that provide a comprehensive view of each topic

  • The Air That We Breathe
    Cities the world over are struggling to improve air quality as scandals surrounding diesel car emissions come to light and the huge health costs of po...
    National Clean Air Day
    For National Clean Air Day, Geographical brings together stories about air pollution and the kind of solutions needed to tackle it ...
    Diabetes: The World at Risk
    Diabetes is often thought of as a ‘western’ problem, one linked to the developed world’s overindulgence in fatty foods and chronic lack of physi...
    The Nuclear Power Struggle
    The UK appears to be embracing nuclear, a huge U-turn on government policy from just two years ago. Yet this seems to be going against the grain globa...
    Hung out to dry
    Wetlands are vital storehouses of biodiversity and important bulwarks against the effects of climate change, while also providing livelihoods for mill...

MORE DOSSIERS

NEVER MISS A STORY - follow Geographical

Want to stay up to date with breaking Geographical stories? Join the thousands following us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and stay informed about the world.

More articles in PLACES...

Water

Ongoing restoration projects are breathing new life into Florida’s Everglades

Cities

Despite protests, an experimental pedestrianisation system is proving to be…

Mapping

National Archives map historian, Rose Mitchell, highlights some of the…

Water

An expedition into the Jordanian desert is helping teachers and…

Mountains

Trivia fans take note, Mount Hope in the British Antarctic…

Water

An enormous hydropower development in Ethiopia is expected to put…

Mapping

From nuclear warnings to whether your favourite band will ‘make…

Mapping

New maps of global reptile distribution reveal significant gaps in…

Forests

Indigenous conservation schemes in Peru can be more effective than…

Mapping

How are the EU member nations faring in the fight…

Mapping

Violence against women violates human rights, and the lack of…

Cities

Deadly heat waves could become more frequent in cities thanks…

Mapping

These 13 poignant infographics are in the running for the…

Mapping

Sometimes referred to as the fourth dimension, time has a…

Forests

A global, citizen-led carbon sequestration scheme is aiming to combat…

Mountains

Among the Himalaya region, which along with most of the…

Cities

Beijing looks set to welcome to its streets an innovative…

Cities

The next step towards declaring London a National Park City…

Mapping

The spatial distribution of healthcare workers globally tells us a…

Forests

After an ‘unprecedented’ surge northwards into New Jersey, New York…