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Species at risk

  • Written by  Benjamin Hennig
  • Published in Mapping
Proportional mapping of countries according to animal and plant local extinction threats Proportional mapping of countries according to animal and plant local extinction threats Benjamin Hennig
19 Dec
2015
Benjamin Hennig maps endangered wildlife species around the world

Trying to get a picture of where and how many species globally are endangered or even at risk of extinction is a difficult undertaking. Mapped here is data from the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List of threatened species including endangered and vulnerable species. The main cartogram shows countries resized according to all animal and plant species assessed as being at risk of local extinction. The two smaller cartograms highlight that conservation efforts have very different spatial degrees of severity, which also partly reflects the different geographical distribution of species.

invertebratesProportional mapping of countries according to invertebrate local extinction threats (Image: Benjamin Hennig)

Invertebrates – estimates range between 97 and 99 per cent of all animals on Earth – are essential elements of ecosystems as waste recyclers and include insects, crabs, crayfish, corals and molluscs. By far the largest group are insects (about a million species). In the cartogram, molluscs are not included in the data while marine species at risk are assigned to the nearest territory.

amphibiansProportional mapping of countries according to amphibians local extinction threats (Image: Benjamin Hennig)

In the IUCN Red List, amphibians are identified as being ‘the most threatened vertebrate group assessed […] with around 41 per cent at risk of extinction.’ Most locally threatened amphibians are observed in South America with the rainforests of Ecuador and Colombia particularly standing out from the cartogram.

For all figures presented here it is important to keep in mind that only a fraction of all known species are assessed with regards to their threat level. Many more remain unknown to mankind, some of which have become extinct in recent years without us even having realised they existed.

Benjamin Hennig (@geoviews) is a senior research fellow at the University of Oxford. He maintains the visualisation blog viewsoftheworld.net

This article was published in the December 2015 edition of Geographical magazine.

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