Our directory of things of interest

University Directory

A billion for Brazil

A billion for Brazil Neil Palmer Photography
31 Oct
2015
The Norwegian government is set to complete the transfer of US$1billion to Brazil’s Amazon Fund, in recognition of the South American country’s efforts to tackle deforestation

Over the past seven years, the rate of Amazon deforestation has fallen by 75 per cent, a drop large enough to earn Brazil a US$1billion bounty from Norway as part of a 2008 deal.

‘Brazil’s achievements in reducing deforestation in the Amazon are truly impressive,’ says Norwegian Minister of Climate and Environment, Tine Sundtoft. ‘The benefits for the global climate, for biodiversity and vital ecosystem services, as well as for the people living in and off the Amazon, are immeasurable. Through the Amazon Fund, Brazil has established what has become a model for other national climate change funds.’

The Amazon Fund is administered by the Brazilian Development Bank (BNDES), the world’s second largest development bank. Norway is the largest contributor, which is paid through the Norway International Climate and Forest Initiative (NICFI), a state pledge to spend up to three billion Norwegian kroner (£234million) per year ‘to help save tropical forests while improving the livelihoods of those who live off, in, and near the forests’. While Brazil has received the majority of the NICFI’s funds, worldwide distribution of funds totalled as much as US$3.3billion (NOK 19.8billion) as of 2014.

A 2014 evaluation of NICFI drew attention to the way in which the programme is succeeding despite difficult circumstances. ‘When NICFI was set up, it all happened as a political initiative,’ says Ida Hellmark, adviser for the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation. ‘The evaluation shows that both the pre-initiative planning and the reporting during the implementation were inadequate. The outcome has clearly been positive, but much has been due to wide political support, large disbursements, greater flexibility and competent employees.’

This article was published in the November 2015 edition of Geographical Magazine.

Related items

Subscribe to Geographical!

geo line break v3

Free eBooks - Geographical Newsletter

Sign up for our weekly newsletter today and get a FREE eBook collection!

LATEST STORIES

geo line break v3

University of Winchester

geo line break v3

EDUCATION PARTNERS

Aberystwyth University University of Greenwich The University of Derby

TRAVEL PARTNERS

Ponant

Silversea

Travel the Unknown

DOSSIERS

Like longer reads? Try our in-depth dossiers that provide a comprehensive view of each topic

  • Natural Capital: Putting a price on nature
    Natural capital is a way to quantify the value of the world that nature provides for us – the air, soils, water, even recreational activity. Advocat...
    The Human Game – Tackling football’s ‘slave trade’
    Few would argue with football’s position as the world’s number one sport. But as Mark Rowe discovers, this global popularity is masking a sinister...
    Essential oil?
    Palm oil is omnipresent in global consumption. But in many circles it is considered the scourge of the natural world, for the deforestation and habita...
    Mexico City: boom town
    Twenty years ago, Mexico City was considered the ultimate urban disaster. But, recent political and economic reforms have transformed it into a hub of...
    Hung out to dry
    Wetlands are vital storehouses of biodiversity and important bulwarks against the effects of climate change, while also providing livelihoods for mill...

MORE DOSSIERS

NEVER MISS A STORY - Follow Geographical on Social

Want to stay up to date with breaking Geographical stories? Join the thousands following us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and stay informed about the world.

More articles in PLACES...

Water

Glacial melt is increasing  land instability in mountainous regions, with huge tsunamis…

Mapping

A large-scale terrain mapping project makes Antarctica the best-mapped continent…

Water

New research reveals that microplastics can survive in mosquitos from…

Cities

New research measures the ability of major cities to re-use…

Deserts

Biosphere 2 was one of the most ambitious experiments in…

Forests

High-quality, affordable drones can revolutionise the way that landscape and…

Mapping

Benjamin Hennig charts the impact of volcanoes on nearby human…

Mapping

A volunteer-led digital mapping project is at the heart of…

Cities

As the planet urbanises, attention is turning towards the most…

Forests

Palm oil is omnipresent in global consumption. But in many…

Cities

A rising number of cruise ships and their ‘overlooked’ diesel…

Mapping

Benjamin Hennig charts the growth and impact of the world’s…

Deserts

Long-term studies reveal the Sahara desert has expanded substantially over…

Water

South America’s wealthiest economy is at a crossroads between environmental…

Forests

The European Court of Justice finds the logging of a…

Mountains

In this extract from his new book, Tides, mountain climber…

Cities

New data from the World Health Organization reveals that nine…

Water

In the wake of the water crisis in Flint, Michigan,…

Mapping

Benjamin Hennig maps out the global production and distribution levels…