Our directory of things of interest

University Directory

The unusual soil-spects

The unusual soil-spects
10 Mar
2018
First global atlas of soil bacteria reveals a small minority of species have dominated world soils

The dirt is alive with a million bacteria, but it appears they have unequal levels of representation. Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have created the world’s first atlas of soil microbes, and have found that a small number of species represent more than half of their populations worldwide. ‘A teaspoon of soil can have a million bacteria individuals, or cells,’ says Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, soil ecologist. ‘Each of these can belong to one of thousands of different species.’

Delgado-Baquerizo’s research was designed to discover the proportion of different types of bacteria species across the globe. However, he found that the same species kept reappearing. ‘Of more than 25,000 bacteria species, we found that just 500 – two per cent of the total – accounted for half of the species in soils everywhere.’

When he says everywhere, he means everywhere. ‘We collected soil samples from 237 different locations across six continents and 18 countries,’ he lists. ‘They spanned an entire range of climates, from deserts to grasslands to wetlands.’ Variations of the 500 turned up in all of them.

Although microbes make up a large portion of the ecosystem’s biodiversity, little is known about what particular species can do. ‘We know that soil microbes are key for processes such as plant production, nutrient cycling, breaking down toxins, even climate regulation,’ says Delgado-Baquerizo. ‘What we don’t know is which species are doing it, even among the most common.’

The new atlas could help researchers focus on the most abundant 500 species – a ‘most-wanted list’ – to determine what they are doing in world soils and why they are so dominant. Understanding their role in the ecosystem could hold the key to maintaining and enhancing soils in the future.

This was published in the March 2018 edition of Geographical magazine

geo line break v3

Free eBooks - Geographical Newsletter

Get the best of Geographical delivered straight to your inbox by signing up to our weekly newsletter and get a free collection of eBooks!

geo line break v3

Related items

NEVER MISS A STORY - Follow Geographical on Social

Want to stay up to date with breaking Geographical stories? Join the thousands following us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and stay informed about the world.

More articles in NATURE...

Geophoto

With guaranteed sunshine, bright blue skies and not a hint…

Oceans

A review of coral-saving methods is helping communities decide which…

Polar

A seven-year study of Patagonia’s ice sheets has revealed the…

Climate

The environmental impact of Bitcoin is higher than its virtual…

Geophoto

With a camera in everyone’s pocket, the once rarified world…

Climate

The idea of the Earth as a self-regulating, living organism…

Oceans

A temporary fishing ban has been imposed by the European…

Wildlife

A look at the contribution of hippos to the savannah…

Wildlife

The new app encourages young children to connect with the…

Energy

A type of panel has been invented that can generate…

Tectonics

In the 4th century BC, Aristotle proposed that earthquakes were…

Climate

The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management pledges to achieve net…

Tectonics

Earthquakes from time immemorial have attracted the attention of the…

Tectonics

A planned kayaking expedition in Nepal took on a whole…

Tectonics

Scientists from Bristol University are working in conjunction with EDF…

Tectonics

In the 1930s, Charles Richter developed a simple scale for…

Tectonics

Researchers at Colombia University have answered a question that has…